According To Scientists, Pacific Islanders Have Ancestry From An Unknown Human Species • MetDaan

According To Scientists, Pacific Islanders Have Ancestry From An Unknown Human Species

DNA

Some 10 years ago, scientists made a discovery that at some point in history, humans interbred with Denisovans and Neanderthals.

In 2008, DNA of a Denisovan was found in a finger bone in a Siberian cave, and two Denisovan teeth were also discovered in the specimen, which confirmed a Neanderthal relative. The Denisovan or Denisova hominin is an extinct species of human in the genus Homo. The species is sometimes given the name Homo sp. Altai, and Homo sapiens ssp. Denisova.

Researchers also discovered DNA remnants of our closely related ancestors in people of Europe, Africa and Asia.

A new research into the genetics of Melanesians led to the discovery of a third, previously unknown species. Melanesians are the dominant inhabitants of Melanesia. Most speak one of the many Papuan languages, though a few groups such as Moluccans, the Motu and Fijians speak Austronesian languages. Melanesians occupy islands from Eastern Indonesia to as far east as the islands of Vanuatu and Fiji.

Statistical geneticist Ryan Bohlender, from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre conducted a computer analysis of the DNA of people living in the northeast of Australia and the surrounding islands, and found traces of an extinict hominid species that was neither Neanderthal nor Denisovan.

Bohlender calculated that Europeans and Chinese people have approximately 2.8% of Neanderthal ancestry in them. The latter group also have some Denisovan ancestry, approximately o.1%

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